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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I guess I'm a little in the dark on what happened to the original Can Am? If they were doing so well... why did they disappear? I hope it doesn't happen to the new Can-Am!
Mark
 

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I guess I'm a little in the dark on what happened to the original Can Am? If they were doing so well... why did they disappear? I hope it doesn't happen to the new Can-Am!
Mark
Can-Am was a motorcycle producing subsidiary of the Canadian Bombardier Corporation.

In 1973, under the direction and leadership of an American Engineer named Gary Robinson and former motocross World Champion, Jeff Smith working with a team of California desert racers, Can-Am began producing motocross and enduro bikes using engines provided by the Austrian Rotax company, another Bombardier subsidiary. The machines made an immediate impact with riders winning Gold, Silver and Bronze medals at the International Six Days Trial, a form of off-road motorcycle Olympics. The following year, the company swept the 1974 AMA 250cc motocross national championship with Can-Am riders finishing first, second and third. The bikes gained a reputation for their high horsepower outputs.

However, soon after the Can-Am introduction, the Bombardier corporation shifted its priority from recreational products towards diversification into the transit equipment industry and then, several years later, into aircraft manufacturing. As a result, investments in the young Can-Am division were reduced substantially. In 1983, Bombardier licensed the brand and outsourced development and production of the Can-Am motorcycles to Armstrong / CCM of Lancashire, England. 1987 was the final year Can-Am motorcycles were produced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can-Am was a motorcycle producing subsidiary of the Canadian Bombardier Corporation.

In 1973, under the direction and leadership of an American Engineer named Gary Robinson and former motocross World Champion, Jeff Smith working with a team of California desert racers, Can-Am began producing motocross and enduro bikes using engines provided by the Austrian Rotax company, another Bombardier subsidiary. The machines made an immediate impact with riders winning Gold, Silver and Bronze medals at the International Six Days Trial, a form of off-road motorcycle Olympics. The following year, the company swept the 1974 AMA 250cc motocross national championship with Can-Am riders finishing first, second and third. The bikes gained a reputation for their high horsepower outputs.

However, soon after the Can-Am introduction, the Bombardier corporation shifted its priority from recreational products towards diversification into the transit equipment industry and then, several years later, into aircraft manufacturing. As a result, investments in the young Can-Am division were reduced substantially. In 1983, Bombardier licensed the brand and outsourced development and production of the Can-Am motorcycles to Armstrong / CCM of Lancashire, England. 1987 was the final year Can-Am motorcycles were produced.
Let's hope they stay focused this time!!!!!! Interesting.
 

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The 1974 can-ams were beautiful, the first manufacture to use plastic gas tanks, the new x quads have the graphics from the 1977 mx bikes, would love to see can-am produce a lightweight on off road enduro similar to the 1974 tnt but modernized maybe 2 stroke e-tec air cooled or and with liquid cooled models with electronic rave valves. lots of low end torque, plus wicked acceleration rush, the old 175 would make my eyes water when it hit midrange revs, but you could putt it around like a trails bike. Make it reliable and fully street legal with the white tank with the orange and red stripes, paint the engine shiny black enamel and I will buy one. Not everybody wants a quad for dirt riding, side by sides are a growth area, but price them the same as in the us. or at least close and I would put it on my list. ps bike shown 1977 mx can-am same graphics styling as the new x quads.
 

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The 1974 can-ams were beautiful, the first manufacture to use plastic gas tanks, the new x quads have the graphics from the 1977 mx bikes, would love to see can-am produce a lightweight on off road enduro similar to the 1974 tnt but modernized maybe 2 stroke e-tec air cooled or and with liquid cooled models with electronic rave valves. lots of low end torque, plus wicked acceleration rush, the old 175 would make my eyes water when it hit midrange revs, but you could putt it around like a trails bike. Make it reliable and fully street legal with the white tank with the orange and red stripes, paint the engine shiny black enamel and I will buy one. Not everybody wants a quad for dirt riding, side by sides are a growth area, but price them the same as in the us. or at least close and I would put it on my list. ps bike shown 1977 mx can-am same graphics styling as the new x quads.
I had a 1981 Can-Am 250 Qualifier. Great bike 2-Stroke , kick start was on opposite side , little things that made it unique. Also very fast
 
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