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Iridium Spark Plugs for GS/RS/RT?


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#1 jomion

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 10:00 PM

The OEM-Recommended spark plug part number for the GS/RS/RT is the NGK DPR9E. Was considering trying the NGK Iridium IX (DPR9EIX) spark plugs to see if there would be any noticeable difference in performance/reliability.

Has anyone else tried these out and have results to report? The benefits reported by the manufacturer are: Slow wear rate providing stable idle, superior anti-fouling, improved fuel efficiency and lower emissions.

Are these worth the extra expense, or are they snake oil?
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#2 tjfischer

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Posted 16 May 2010 - 11:39 PM

The OEM-Recommended spark plug part number for the GS/RS/RT is the NGK DPR9E. Was considering trying the NGK Iridium IX (DPR9EIX) spark plugs to see if there would be any noticeable difference in performance/reliability.

Has anyone else tried these out and have results to report? The benefits reported by the manufacturer are: Slow wear rate providing stable idle, superior anti-fouling, improved fuel efficiency and lower emissions.

Are these worth the extra expense, or are they snake oil?


I use the Iridium plugs. I think they make a difference in performance. They also last longer. I have had the same set for approximately 38,000 miles. This last tune up (every 12,000) was the first time I have had to gap them.
"Speak ill of no man, but speak all the good you know of everybody." Benjamin Franklin

#3 jomion

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 07:46 AM

The OEM-Recommended spark plug part number for the GS/RS/RT is the NGK DPR9E. Was considering trying the NGK Iridium IX (DPR9EIX) spark plugs to see if there would be any noticeable difference in performance/reliability.

Has anyone else tried these out and have results to report? The benefits reported by the manufacturer are: Slow wear rate providing stable idle, superior anti-fouling, improved fuel efficiency and lower emissions.

Are these worth the extra expense, or are they snake oil?


I put in the Iridium plugs (DPR9EIX) over the weekend, gapped to 0.030 inches. I noticed that the previous plugs, installed by the dealer, did NOT have any thermal paste on the threads! So much for following the service manual...

After installing, the only immediate difference observed is there is definitely a little more "snap" to the throttle. I'll report back after a few hundred miles to let you know if there is any difference in performance or mileage.

If I don't have to change these plugs for 35K to 50K miles, it's worth the extra cost and hassle getting to the spark plugs.
"Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death..."
- Hunter S. Thompson
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#4 Marc

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 08:12 AM

I put in the Iridium plugs (DPR9EIX) over the weekend, gapped to 0.030 inches. I noticed that the previous plugs, installed by the dealer, did NOT have any thermal paste on the threads! So much for following the service manual...

After installing, the only immediate difference observed is there is definitely a little more "snap" to the throttle. I'll report back after a few hundred miles to let you know if there is any difference in performance or mileage.

If I don't have to change these plugs for 35K to 50K miles, it's worth the extra cost and hassle getting to the spark plugs.


I think I will try switching when the time comes to replace. Let us know how they work out for you.

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#5 burg650

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 04:37 PM

What's the reason for the thermal paste on the threads?. Is this the same paste you put on the plug wire before you put it on?

Edited by burg650, 01 June 2010 - 04:38 PM.


#6 Steelcitytransplant

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Posted 01 June 2010 - 05:58 PM

What's the reason for the thermal paste on the threads?. Is this the same paste you put on the plug wire before you put it on?

No, The lubricant you put on the plug wire boot is a silicon lub for easier removal, the paste you put on the plug threads is a heat dispersant. This can be purchased at Radio Shack, heat sink paste.
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#7 DragonSpyder

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Posted 03 June 2010 - 11:48 AM

I put in the Iridium plugs (DPR9EIX) over the weekend, gapped to 0.030 inches. I noticed that the previous plugs, installed by the dealer, did NOT have any thermal paste on the threads! So much for following the service manual...

After installing, the only immediate difference observed is there is definitely a little more "snap" to the throttle. I'll report back after a few hundred miles to let you know if there is any difference in performance or mileage.

If I don't have to change these plugs for 35K to 50K miles, it's worth the extra cost and hassle getting to the spark plugs.



You should not need to gap irridium plugs. Most manufacturers do not recommend gapping them.

Q. Do I need to set the gap?
A. Generally, no. The DENSO Iridium Power plug comes pre-set with a protective sleeve over the firing end, to protect the gap from accidental alteration. DENSO Iridium Power’s ultra-efficient firing power compensates for normally recommended gap settings that are smaller than the pre-set value. In the cases of vehicle modifications (nitrous, turbo-chargers, super-chargers, high power ignition systems, etc.), some adjustments may be desired. Or, if you prefer to remain consistent with factory specifications, you may adjust. However, please be careful not to place any stress on the fine center electrode during adjustment. You could accidentally break off the very hard, and therefore brittle, tip.

#8 jomion

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Posted 04 June 2010 - 12:16 AM

You should not need to gap irridium plugs. Most manufacturers do not recommend gapping them.

Q. Do I need to set the gap?
A. Generally, no. The DENSO Iridium Power plug comes pre-set with a protective sleeve over the firing end, to protect the gap from accidental alteration. DENSO Iridium Power’s ultra-efficient firing power compensates for normally recommended gap settings that are smaller than the pre-set value. In the cases of vehicle modifications (nitrous, turbo-chargers, super-chargers, high power ignition systems, etc.), some adjustments may be desired. Or, if you prefer to remain consistent with factory specifications, you may adjust. However, please be careful not to place any stress on the fine center electrode during adjustment. You could accidentally break off the very hard, and therefore brittle, tip.


No worries...I used a feeler gauge just to check the gap. It was preset at 0.030 inches, which is where it needed to be.
"Faster, faster, faster, until the thrill of speed overcomes the fear of death..."
- Hunter S. Thompson
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